Sequential fungal pretreatment of unsterilized Miscanthus: changes in composition, cellulose digestibility and microbial communities

Abstract: A sequential fungal pretreatment of Miscanthus × giganteus was conducted by mixing unsterilized Miscanthus with material previously colonized with the white-rot fungus Ceriporiopsis subvermispora. For three generations, each generation started with inoculation by mixing unsterilized fresh Miscanthus with end material from the previous generation and ended after 28 days of incubation at 28 °C. After the first generation, the cellulose digestibility of the material doubled, compared to that of the unsterilized Miscanthus, but the second and third generations showed no enhancements in cellulose digestibility. Furthermore, high degradation of Miscanthus structural carbohydrates occurred during the first generation. A microbial community study showed that, even though the fungal community of the material previously colonized by C. subvermispora was composed mainly of this fungus (> 99%), by the first generation its relative abundance was down to only 9%, and other microbes had prevailed. Additionally, changes in the bacterial community occurred that might be associated with unwanted cellulose degradation in the system. This reiterates the necessity of feedstock microbial load reduction for the stability and reproducibility of fungal pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass.

Key points:

• Sequential fungal pretreatment of unsterilized Miscanthus was unsuccessful.

• Feedstock changes with white-rot fungi favored the growth of other microorganisms.

• Feedstock microbial reduction is necessary for pretreatment with C. subvermispora.

This version of the article has been accepted for publication, after peer review (when applicable) and is subject to Springer Nature’s AM terms of use, but is not the Version of Record and does not reflect post-acceptance improvements, or any corrections. The Version of Record is available online at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00253-022-11833-1

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Work Title Sequential fungal pretreatment of unsterilized Miscanthus: changes in composition, cellulose digestibility and microbial communities
Access
Open Access
Creators
  1. Juliana Vasco-Correa
  2. Rachel Capouya
  3. Ajay Shah
  4. Thomas K. Mitchell
Keyword
  1. White rot fungi
  2. Lignocellulosic biomass
  3. Non-sterile
  4. Fungal communities
License In Copyright (Rights Reserved)
Work Type Article
Publisher
  1. Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology
Publication Date February 16, 2022
Publisher Identifier (DOI)
  1. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00253-022-11833-1
Deposited March 25, 2024

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Version 1
published

  • Created
  • Added Manuscript_-_edited.pdf
  • Added Creator Juliana Vasco-Correa
  • Added Creator Rachel Capouya
  • Added Creator Ajay Shah
  • Added Creator Thomas K. Mitchell
  • Published
  • Updated
  • Updated Keyword, Description, Publication Date Show Changes
    Keyword
    • White rot fungi, Lignocellulosic biomass, Non-sterile, Fungal communities
    Description
    • <p>Abstract: A sequential fungal pretreatment of Miscanthus × giganteus was conducted by mixing unsterilized Miscanthus with material previously colonized with the white-rot fungus Ceriporiopsis subvermispora. For three generations, each generation started with inoculation by mixing unsterilized fresh Miscanthus with end material from the previous generation and ended after 28 days of incubation at 28 °C. After the first generation, the cellulose digestibility of the material doubled, compared to that of the unsterilized Miscanthus, but the second and third generations showed no enhancements in cellulose digestibility. Furthermore, high degradation of Miscanthus structural carbohydrates occurred during the first generation. A microbial community study showed that, even though the fungal community of the material previously colonized by C. subvermispora was composed mainly of this fungus (&gt; 99%), by the first generation its relative abundance was down to only 9%, and other microbes had prevailed. Additionally, changes in the bacterial community occurred that might be associated with unwanted cellulose degradation in the system. This reiterates the necessity of feedstock microbial load reduction for the stability and reproducibility of fungal pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass. Key points: • Sequential fungal pretreatment of unsterilized Miscanthus was unsuccessful. • Feedstock changes with white-rot fungi favored the growth of other microorganisms. • Feedstock microbial reduction is necessary for pretreatment with C. subvermispora.</p>
    • <p>Abstract: A sequential fungal pretreatment of _Miscanthus × giganteus_ was conducted by mixing unsterilized _Miscanthus_ with material previously colonized with the white-rot fungus _Ceriporiopsis subvermispora_. For three generations, each generation started with inoculation by mixing unsterilized fresh _Miscanthus_ with end material from the previous generation and ended after 28 days of incubation at 28 °C. After the first generation, the cellulose digestibility of the material doubled, compared to that of the unsterilized _Miscanthus_, but the second and third generations showed no enhancements in cellulose digestibility. Furthermore, high degradation of _Miscanthus_ structural carbohydrates occurred during the first generation. A microbial community study showed that, even though the fungal community of the material previously colonized by _C. subvermispora_ was composed mainly of this fungus (&gt; 99%), by the first generation its relative abundance was down to only 9%, and other microbes had prevailed. Additionally, changes in the bacterial community occurred that might be associated with unwanted cellulose degradation in the system. This reiterates the necessity of feedstock microbial load reduction for the stability and reproducibility of fungal pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass.
    • Key points:
    • • Sequential fungal pretreatment of unsterilized Miscanthus was unsuccessful.
    • • Feedstock changes with white-rot fungi favored the growth of other microorganisms.
    • • Feedstock microbial reduction is necessary for pretreatment with _C. subvermispora._</p>
    Publication Date
    • 2022-03-01
    • 2022-02-16