eHealth Literacy Promotion Program in a Local Congregation

Background: One in three Americans experience low levels of health literacy (HL) which leads to numerous negative health outcomes and increased health care costs. Low HL disproportionately affects older adults leading to further health complications. All forms of HL, and increasingly electronic health (eHealth) literacy, are essential skills to navigating the health system and making informed health decisions.

Local Problem: At a local congregation with a high density of older adult members, no health promotion program/ministry is established.

Methods: Using the theoretical perspective of Bandura’s self-efficacy theory and an eHealth literacy program structure based on the National Institute of Health’s Training the Trainer Program Outline, a weekly education-based program was established by the health ministry for six weeks. Participants were recruited from the congregation. Pre- and post-intervention measures include the eHEALS survey and project lead developed feedback surveys. These feedback surveys were also distributed at midpoint.

Interventions: An eHealth literacy promotion program was established and designed for older adult congregation members. There were six sessions lasting 60-90 minutes for a period of six weeks.

Results: The pre- and post-intervention eHealth literacy scores showed statistically significant improvement with a p-value of <0.001. Clinically significant results include that 90% of participants plan to apply every skill they learned, while 100% plan to use their portal to message their doctor. Findings suggested the intervention improved eHealth literacy of older adults, positively affected their trust in federal government health websites, and provided a skillset for future use.

Conclusions: Health ministries, and their programs, can be a successful method and host to improve eHealth literacy in the older adult population.

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Work Title eHealth Literacy Promotion Program in a Local Congregation
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Penn State
Creators
  1. Kaitlyn Keller
  2. Susan Leight
  3. Sheilah Yohn
  4. Kristen Bransby
Keyword
  1. DNP Project
  2. Health literacy
  3. eHealth literacy
  4. Health promotion
  5. Health ministry
  6. Faith setting
  7. Church
  8. Older adults
License In Copyright (Rights Reserved)
Work Type Project
Publication Date February 27, 2024
Deposited February 27, 2024

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Version 1
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  • Created
  • Updated
  • Added Creator Kaitlyn Keller
  • Added Creator Susan Leight
  • Added Creator Sheilah Yohn
  • Added Creator Kristen Bransby
  • Added Keller_Squire_February 2.docx
  • Updated License Show Changes
    License
    • https://rightsstatements.org/page/InC/1.0/
  • Published
  • Updated Keyword, Description Show Changes
    Keyword
    • DNP Project, Health literacy, eHealth literacy, Health promotion, Health ministry, Faith setting, Church, Older adults
    Description
    • Background: One in three Americans experience low levels of health literacy (HL) which leads to numerous negative health outcomes and increased health care costs. Low HL disproportionately affects older adults leading to further health complications. All forms of HL, and increasingly electronic health (eHealth) literacy, are essential skills to navigating the health system and making informed health decisions.
    • Local Problem: At a local congregation with a high density of older adult members, no health promotion program/ministry is established.
    • Methods: Using the theoretical perspective of Bandura’s self-efficacy theory and an eHealth literacy program structure based on the National Institute of Health’s Training the Trainer Program Outline, a weekly education-based program was established by the health ministry for six weeks. Participants were recruited from the congregation. Pre- and post-intervention measures include the eHEALS survey and project lead developed feedback surveys. These feedback surveys were also distributed at midpoint.
    • Interventions: An eHealth literacy promotion program was established and designed for older adult congregation members. There were six sessions lasting 60-90 minutes for a period of six weeks.
    • Results: The pre- and post-intervention eHealth literacy scores showed statistically significant improvement with a p-value of <0.001. Clinically significant results include that 90% of participants plan to apply every skill they learned, while 100% plan to use their portal to message their doctor. Findings suggested the intervention improved eHealth literacy of older adults, positively affected their trust in federal government health websites, and provided a skillset for future use.
    • Conclusions: Health ministries, and their programs, can be a successful method and host to improve eHealth literacy in the older adult population.
    • Keywords: Health literacy, eHealth literacy, health promotion, health ministry, faith setting, church, older adults.
  • Updated