Methodology for Assessing the Impact of Four-Day Work Week on Manufacturing and the Environment

The standard five-day work week, widely adopted in the Western world, emerged as a transformative shift from the once-prevalent 70-hour work weeks in various industries. This change was initiated by Henry Ford in 1926, marking the inception of the modern work schedule. Over the past century, the structure of the work week has faced scrutiny, leading to a growing campaign advocating for a further reduction in working hours [1]. Notably, the concept of a four-day work week has gained momentum, finding implementation in certain European countries. In this study, a methodology for a comparative analysis between the traditional five-day, forty-hour work week and the emerging four-day forty hour alternative is presented. The focus is on understanding the implications of these work schedules on the environment, electricity consumption, and manufacturing processes. Key parameters under scrutiny include electricity consumption, production metrics of throughput, time in the system, and effective worker utilization. Examining electricity consumption entails calculating the total electricity consumed in a manufacturing facility based on its operational hours and rated power. Specific attention will be given to equipment like motors, compressors, and HVAC systems, which exhibit high startup currents during brief periods, impacting overall electricity consumption. A reduction in the number of working days is anticipated to have a positive effect on greenhouse gas emissions, as it correlates with decreased commuting by employees. This study also aims to provide a methodology or a template for manufacturing industries to assess and compare the impact of the change in work schedules. By analyzing throughput, time in the system, and maintenance worker utilization, the aim is to evaluate and compare the productivity of manufacturing facilities operating under both the traditional five-day work week and the evolving four-day model. This research attempts to quantify the potential environmental benefits and efficiency gains associated with shorter work weeks in the realm of manufacturing.

Advisor - Dr. Catherine Harmonosky

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Work Title Methodology for Assessing the Impact of Four-Day Work Week on Manufacturing and the Environment
Access
Open Access
Creators
  1. Pranaav Sankar Subramanian
Keyword
  1. Reduced Work week
  2. Simulation
License CC BY 4.0 (Attribution)
Work Type Research Paper
Acknowledgments
  1. PennTAP
Publication Date March 14, 2024
Deposited April 01, 2024

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  • Updated Description, Publication Date Show Changes
    Description
    • The standard five-day work week, widely adopted in the Western world, emerged as a transformative shift from the once-prevalent 70-hour work weeks in various industries. This change was initiated by Henry Ford in 1926, marking the inception of the modern work schedule. Over the past century, the structure of the work week has faced scrutiny, leading to a growing campaign advocating for a further reduction in working hours [1]. Notably, the concept of a four-day work week has gained momentum, finding implementation in certain European countries.
    • In this study, a methodology for a comparative analysis between the traditional five-day, forty-hour work week and the emerging four-day forty hour alternative is presented. The focus is on understanding the implications of these work schedules on the environment, electricity consumption, and manufacturing processes. Key parameters under scrutiny include electricity consumption, production metrics of throughput, time in the system, and effective worker utilization.
    • Examining electricity consumption entails calculating the total electricity consumed in a manufacturing facility based on its operational hours and rated power. Specific attention will be given to equipment like motors, compressors, and HVAC systems, which exhibit high startup currents during brief periods, impacting overall electricity consumption. A reduction in the number of working days is anticipated to have a positive effect on greenhouse gas emissions, as it correlates with decreased commuting by employees.
    • This study also aims to provide a methodology or a template for manufacturing industries to assess and compare the impact of the change in work schedules. By analyzing throughput, time in the system, and maintenance worker utilization, the aim is to evaluate and compare the productivity of manufacturing facilities operating under both the traditional five-day work week and the evolving four-day model. This research attempts to quantify the potential environmental benefits and efficiency gains associated with shorter work weeks in the realm of manufacturing.
    Publication Date
    • 2024-03-14
  • Updated Description Show Changes
    Description
    • The standard five-day work week, widely adopted in the Western world, emerged as a transformative shift from the once-prevalent 70-hour work weeks in various industries. This change was initiated by Henry Ford in 1926, marking the inception of the modern work schedule. Over the past century, the structure of the work week has faced scrutiny, leading to a growing campaign advocating for a further reduction in working hours [1]. Notably, the concept of a four-day work week has gained momentum, finding implementation in certain European countries.
    • In this study, a methodology for a comparative analysis between the traditional five-day, forty-hour work week and the emerging four-day forty hour alternative is presented. The focus is on understanding the implications of these work schedules on the environment, electricity consumption, and manufacturing processes. Key parameters under scrutiny include electricity consumption, production metrics of throughput, time in the system, and effective worker utilization.
    • Examining electricity consumption entails calculating the total electricity consumed in a manufacturing facility based on its operational hours and rated power. Specific attention will be given to equipment like motors, compressors, and HVAC systems, which exhibit high startup currents during brief periods, impacting overall electricity consumption. A reduction in the number of working days is anticipated to have a positive effect on greenhouse gas emissions, as it correlates with decreased commuting by employees.
    • This study also aims to provide a methodology or a template for manufacturing industries to assess and compare the impact of the change in work schedules. By analyzing throughput, time in the system, and maintenance worker utilization, the aim is to evaluate and compare the productivity of manufacturing facilities operating under both the traditional five-day work week and the evolving four-day model. This research attempts to quantify the potential environmental benefits and efficiency gains associated with shorter work weeks in the realm of manufacturing.
    • This study also aims to provide a methodology or a template for manufacturing industries to assess and compare the impact of the change in work schedules. By analyzing throughput, time in the system, and maintenance worker utilization, the aim is to evaluate and compare the productivity of manufacturing facilities operating under both the traditional five-day work week and the evolving four-day model. This research attempts to quantify the potential environmental benefits and efficiency gains associated with shorter work weeks in the realm of manufacturing.
    • Advisor - Dr. Catherine Harmonosky
  • Updated Keyword Show Changes
    Keyword
    • Reduced Work week, Simulation
  • Added Creator Pranaav Sankar Subramanian
  • Updated Acknowledgments Show Changes
    Acknowledgments
    • PennTAP
  • Added Pranaav Masters paper.pdf
  • Updated License Show Changes
    License
    • https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
  • Published
  • Updated