Using a Risk Prioritization Tool for Intimate Partner Stalking: The Feasibility, Acceptability, and Appropriateness of Forensic Nurses Using the Screening Assessment for Stalking and Harassment in the Hospital Setting

BACKGROUND: Intimate partner stalking (IPS) is a form of stalking where the perpetrator is a current or former partner. This is the most common and most dangerous form of stalking, nearly doubling the risk for homicide. While validated tools exist for identifying which cases are more likely to involve physical violence, they are not commonly used in the hospital setting by forensic nurses.

METHODS: A comprehensive Forensic Nurse Examiner (FNE) team at a level one trauma center in Colorado was selected to implement a validated risk prioritization tool for IPS called the Screening Assessment for Stalking and Harassment (SASH). Nurses’ perception of feasibility, acceptability and the appropriateness of using the tool was assessed using a Likert-style survey adapted from Weiner et al. (2017) pre- and post-training on the use of the SASH. FNE’s compliance in using the tool was calculated by comparing the number of eligible individuals for the tool versus those who received it.

INTERVENTION: FNEs received a 3.5-hour training on stalking and the SASH. The survey was administered before and after the training. Following training, FNEs began using the SASH with individuals according to eligibility criteria prescribed by the authors of the SASH. RESULTS: The average scores for feasibility, acceptability, and appropriateness increased following the education and training, indicating that the nurses’ opinion of using the SASH became more favorable as they learned more about the tool. The most significant area of change occurred within the feasibility measure. Over nine weeks, 23 out of 54 (42.5%) individuals with a completed Danger Assessment were eligible for the SASH. Under the project constraints, 18 individuals were eligible for the SASH. Of these, nine individuals received the SASH, resulting in an FNE compliance rate of 50%.

CONCLUSION: Forensic nurses are uniquely positioned not only to administer the SASH for individuals experiencing stalking by a former intimate partner but to intervene at a point of crisis intervention. This project has the potential to be incorporated into a variety of sexual assault and domestic violence programs, as it demonstrates the usability of the SASH by nurses.

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Work Title Using a Risk Prioritization Tool for Intimate Partner Stalking: The Feasibility, Acceptability, and Appropriateness of Forensic Nurses Using the Screening Assessment for Stalking and Harassment in the Hospital Setting
Access
Open Access
Creators
  1. Bethany Copper
Keyword
  1. Stalking
  2. Intimate partner violence
  3. Risk assessment
  4. Prioritization
  5. Acceptability
  6. Feasibility
  7. Appropriateness
  8. Forensic nurse
  9. Doctor of Nursing Practice
License No Copyright - U.S.
Work Type Project
Acknowledgments
  1. Dr. Sheridan Miyamoto, PhD, FNP, RN, FAAN
  2. Dr. Mariya Tankimovich, DNP, CRNP, FNP-C, CNE
  3. Dr. Cara Exten, PhD, MPH
Publication Date 2022
Subject
  1. Nursing
  2. Forensic nursing
  3. Intimate partner violence
Language
  1. English
Deposited April 28, 2022

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Version 1
published

  • Created
  • Updated
  • Updated
  • Updated Acknowledgments Show Changes
    Acknowledgments
    • Dr. Sheridan Miyamoto, PhD, FNP, RN, FAAN, Dr. Mariya Tankimovich, DNP, CRNP, FNP-C, CNE, Dr. Cara Exten, PhD, MPH
  • Added Creator Bethany Copper
  • Added B_Copper_Using a risk prioritization tool for Intimate Partner Stalking_FINAL.docx
  • Updated License Show Changes
    License
    • https://rightsstatements.org/page/NoC-US/1.0/
  • Published

Version 2
published

  • Created
  • Updated Keyword Show Changes
    Keyword
    • stalking, intimate partner violence, risk assessment, prioritization, acceptability, feasibility, appropriateness, forensic nurse
    • stalking, intimate partner violence, risk assessment, prioritization, acceptability, feasibility, appropriateness, forensic nurse, Doctor of Nursing Practice
  • Published
  • Updated Keyword, Subject, Description Show Changes
    Keyword
    • stalking, intimate partner violence, risk assessment, prioritization, acceptability, feasibility, appropriateness, forensic nurse, Doctor of Nursing Practice
    • Stalking, Intimate partner violence, Risk assessment, Prioritization, Acceptability, Feasibility, Appropriateness, Forensic nurse, Doctor of Nursing Practice
    Subject
    • nursing, forensic nursing, intimate partner violence
    • Nursing, Forensic nursing, Intimate partner violence
    Description
    • BACKGROUND: Intimate partner stalking (IPS) is a form of stalking where the perpetrator is a current or former partner. This is the most common and most dangerous form of stalking, nearly doubling the risk for homicide. While validated tools exist for identifying which cases are more likely to involve physical violence, they are not commonly used in the hospital setting by forensic nurses.
    • METHODS: A comprehensive Forensic Nurse Examiner (FNE) team at a level one trauma center in Colorado was selected to implement a validated risk prioritization tool for IPS called the Screening Assessment for Stalking and Harassment (SASH). Nurses’ perception of feasibility, acceptability and the appropriateness of using the tool was assessed using a Likert-style survey adapted from Weiner et al. (2017) pre- and post-training on the use of the SASH. FNE’s compliance in using the tool was calculated by comparing the number of eligible individuals for the tool versus those who received it.
    • INTERVENTION: FNEs received a 3.5-hour training on stalking and the SASH. The survey was administered before and after the training. Following training, FNEs began using the SASH with individuals according to eligibility criteria prescribed by the authors of the SASH.
    • RESULTS: The average scores for feasibility, acceptability, and appropriateness increased following the education and training, indicating that the nurses’ opinion of using the SASH became more favorable as they learned more about the tool. The most significant area of change occurred within the feasibility measure. Over nine weeks, 23 out of 54 (42.5%) individuals with a completed Danger Assessment were eligible for the SASH. Under the project constraints, 18 individuals were eligible for the SASH. Of these, nine individuals received the SASH, resulting in an FNE compliance rate of 50%.
    • CONCLUSION: Forensic nurses are uniquely positioned not only to administer the SASH for individuals experiencing stalking by a former intimate partner but to intervene at a point of crisis intervention. This project has the potential to be incorporated into a variety of sexual assault and domestic violence programs, as it demonstrates the usability of the SASH by nurses.