The effect of diagrams on online reading processes and memory

This work examined how adjunct displays influence college readers' moment-by-moment processing of text and the products of reading, using reading time (Experiments 1 & 2), and think-aloud methodologies (Experiment 3). Participants did or did not study a diagram before reading a text. Overall, the reading time data, think-aloud data, and recall data were consistent with the no-increased-effort hypothesis, which states that a diagram can facilitate comprehension, although readers may not engage in more effortful online processing. These data suggest that studying a diagram before reading can improve memory for an expository text without necessarily increasing online effort.

Files

  • DP_2011_CDs.pdf

    size: 329 KB | mime_type: application/pdf | date: 2023-08-09 | sha256: e0ea088

Metadata

Work Title The effect of diagrams on online reading processes and memory
Access
Open Access
Creators
  1. Matthew T. Mccrudden
  2. Joseph P. Magliano
  3. Gregory Schraw
License In Copyright (Rights Reserved)
Work Type Article
Publisher
  1. Discourse Processes
Publication Date February 18, 2011
Publisher Identifier (DOI)
  1. https://doi.org/10.1080/01638531003694561
Deposited August 09, 2023

Versions

Analytics

Collections

This resource is currently not in any collection.

Work History

Version 1
published

  • Created
  • Added DP_2011_CDs.pdf
  • Added Creator Matthew T. Mccrudden
  • Added Creator Joseph P. Magliano
  • Added Creator Gregory Schraw
  • Published
  • Updated Description, Publication Date Show Changes
    Description
    • x
    • This work examined how adjunct displays influence college readers' moment-by-moment processing of text and the products of reading, using reading time (Experiments 1 & 2), and think-aloud methodologies (Experiment 3). Participants did or did not study a diagram before reading a text. Overall, the reading time data, think-aloud data, and recall data were consistent with the no-increased-effort hypothesis, which states that a diagram can facilitate comprehension, although readers may not engage in more effortful online processing. These data suggest that studying a diagram before reading can improve memory for an expository text without necessarily increasing online effort.
    Publication Date
    • 2011-01-31
    • 2011-02-18
  • Updated