Physical Activity and Risk of Hepatocellular Carcinoma: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Background & Aims: Physical activity offers promise to protect against multiple non-hepatic primary cancers. We performed a systematic review to quantify the association between physical activity and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) risk.

Methods: We searched the Cochrane Library, Embase, Medline and trial registries through December 2020 for studies that measured physical activity levels in adults at risk for HCC. The primary outcome was HCC. Subgroup analysis was performed limiting to vigorous physical activity. Proportions and random-effects odds ratios (OR) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated.

Results: Seven studies met inclusion criteria, comprising 777,662 subjects (median age 55 years; 55% female). Greater amounts of physical activity were associated with less HCC (OR 0.65, 95% CI 0.45–0.95, p = 0.03) compared to lower amounts. Vigorous physical activity was associated with even less HCC (OR 0.62, 95% CI 0.49–0.79, p < 0.01).

Conclusions: This meta-analysis demonstrates that greater amounts of physical activity are associated with lower odds of HCC. These results support the use of regular physical activity as an effective way to prevent HCC and provide helpful data to support a for future exercise-based interventional study to better define the optimal exercise prescription for patients at risk for primary liver cancer.

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Work Title Physical Activity and Risk of Hepatocellular Carcinoma: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
Access
Open Access
Creators
  1. Kara DiJoseph
  2. Audrey Thorp
  3. Alex Harrington
  4. Kathryn H. Schmitz
  5. Vernon M. Chinchilli
  6. Jonathan G. Stine
Keyword
  1. Liver
  2. Cancer
  3. Cirrhosis
  4. Exercise
  5. Chemoprevention
License In Copyright (Rights Reserved)
Work Type Article
Publisher
  1. Digestive Diseases and Sciences
Publication Date June 22, 2022
Publisher Identifier (DOI)
  1. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10620-022-07601-w
Deposited March 07, 2024

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Version 1
published

  • Created
  • Added DiJoseph2022_Article_PhysicalActivityAndRiskOfHepat.pdf
  • Added Creator Alex Harrington
  • Added Creator Kara DiJoseph
  • Added Creator Kara Dijoseph
  • Added Creator Audrey Thorp
  • Added Creator Jonathan Stine
  • Added Creator Alex Harrington
  • Added Creator Audrey Thorp
  • Added Creator Kathryn Schmitz
  • Added Creator Kathryn H Schmitz
  • Added Creator Vernon M. Chinchilli
  • Added Creator Vernon M Chinchilli
  • Added Creator Jonathan G. Stine
  • Published
  • Updated Keyword, Description, Publication Date Show Changes
    Keyword
    • Liver, Cancer, Cirrhosis, Exercise, Chemoprevention
    Description
    • Background &amp; Aims: Physical activity offers promise to protect against multiple non-hepatic primary cancers. We performed a systematic review to quantify the association between physical activity and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) risk. Methods: We searched the Cochrane Library, Embase, Medline and trial registries through December 2020 for studies that measured physical activity levels in adults at risk for HCC. The primary outcome was HCC. Subgroup analysis was performed limiting to vigorous physical activity. Proportions and random-effects odds ratios (OR) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. Results: Seven studies met inclusion criteria, comprising 777,662 subjects (median age 55 years; 55% female). Greater amounts of physical activity were associated with less HCC (OR 0.65, 95% CI 0.45–0.95, p = 0.03) compared to lower amounts. Vigorous physical activity was associated with even less HCC (OR 0.62, 95% CI 0.49–0.79, p &lt; 0.01). Conclusions: This meta-analysis demonstrates that greater amounts of physical activity are associated with lower odds of HCC. These results support the use of regular physical activity as an effective way to prevent HCC and provide helpful data to support a for future exercise-based interventional study to better define the optimal exercise prescription for patients at risk for primary liver cancer.
    • Background &amp; Aims: Physical activity offers promise to protect against multiple non-hepatic primary cancers. We performed a systematic review to quantify the association between physical activity and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) risk.
    • Methods: We searched the Cochrane Library, Embase, Medline and trial registries through December 2020 for studies that measured physical activity levels in adults at risk for HCC. The primary outcome was HCC. Subgroup analysis was performed limiting to vigorous physical activity. Proportions and random-effects odds ratios (OR) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated.
    • Results: Seven studies met inclusion criteria, comprising 777,662 subjects (median age 55 years; 55% female). Greater amounts of physical activity were associated with less HCC (OR 0.65, 95% CI 0.45–0.95, p = 0.03) compared to lower amounts. Vigorous physical activity was associated with even less HCC (OR 0.62, 95% CI 0.49–0.79, p &lt; 0.01).
    • Conclusions: This meta-analysis demonstrates that greater amounts of physical activity are associated with lower odds of HCC. These results support the use of regular physical activity as an effective way to prevent HCC and provide helpful data to support a for future exercise-based interventional study to better define the optimal exercise prescription for patients at risk for primary liver cancer.
    Publication Date
    • 2022-01-01
    • 2022-06-22
  • Deleted Creator Alex Harrington
  • Deleted Creator Kara Dijoseph
  • Deleted Creator Jonathan Stine
  • Deleted Creator Audrey Thorp
  • Deleted Creator Kathryn Schmitz
  • Deleted Creator Vernon M Chinchilli
  • Updated Creator Kara DiJoseph
  • Updated Creator Audrey Thorp
  • Updated Creator Alex Harrington
  • Renamed Creator Kathryn H. Schmitz Show Changes
    • Kathryn H Schmitz
    • Kathryn H. Schmitz
  • Updated Creator Vernon M. Chinchilli
  • Updated Creator Jonathan G. Stine
  • Updated