Remote Controlled Vehicle From Scratch

As a perspective mechanical engineer looking to be among those in the forefront of developing and innovating electric vehicle technology, I am consistently looking for ways to expand my knowledge how electric motors work, problems associated with electric Motors, and implementation of electric Motors and the automotive industry. So it will come as no surprise that for my final project Engineering and Design 100 Course last Fall semester, I decided to go above and beyond what was required of me in pursuit of knowledge and experience in working with electric motors. I would build my own remote-controlled vehicle. This RC vehicle is modeled after what are my most anticipated upcoming electric vehicles, the Tesla Cyber Truck. It features matching aesthetic components, paired with practical functionality. The vehicle is capable of moving both forward and backward, as well as turning left and right, utilizing a steering system modeled after that which can be seen in real life cars. This project challenged me not only academically, but intellectually as well as I had to endure the process of designing, failing, learning, and then improving. From this project, I was able to learn a bit about electric motors, how the steering system in our cars work, as well as some basic machining skills. However, the most important thing that I have taken away from this project is, that everything has a process, and it means to be an engineer. When I first started the project, I thought that it would be as simple as taking a body, slapping some wheels on it attached to a motor and using a serval to help with the steering. boy was out so wrong, now looking back on it I'm glad that I was wrong, because through my ignorance of the true difficulty and scale of the project, I was able to walk out of it with a new understanding of what it means to be an engineer.

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Work Title Remote Controlled Vehicle From Scratch
Access
Open Access
Creators
  1. Alvin Spruill
Keyword
  1. Engineering, Electric Car, Rc Cars
License GNU General Public License (GPLv3)
Work Type Project
Acknowledgments
  1. While this project was an amazing accomplishment, none of it would have been even remotely possible without the help of the staff in the Force Lab; Barrett, John, and Russ. All three of them were there by my side helping me every step of the way, whether it be securing the appropriate materials for the project, and helping me to understand how they work, assisting me with the utilization of the machinery required to make some of the parts that I needed, or helping me to come up with brand new designs to accommodate the needs that that arose as we encountered new problems. All of them were extremely helpful and played our major role in helping me to complete my project not only on time, but to meet and even exceed many of the project requirements. A special thanks to Barrett, John, and Russ for their hard work, commitment, and assistance with this project.
  2. Dr. Christopher Martin played a critical role and helping me to comprehend some of the complex mechanical applications of the parts being utilized for this project. Such as critiquing my designs and explaining physical and mathematical applications and relationships between different forces and momentums associated with designing the steering system and fitting the wheels. This all helped with designing the steering system in a way that makes the vehicle physically practical, while at the same time being as effective as possible and fitting within the specified parameters. I was greatly inspired by his level of intellect and ability to breakdown problems into small, comprehensible chunks that can be tackled one by one. I truly believe that not only was he a huge help with my project, but that he played a critical role in he played a critical role in confirming to me that mechanical engineering is the correct career path for me.
Publication Date 2021
Subject
  1. Engineering
  2. RC Car
  3. Project
  4. Learning
  5. Electric
Language
  1. English
Geographic Area
  1. Pennsylvania, USA
Deposited April 04, 2021

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Version 1
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  • Created
  • Updated Acknowledgments Show Changes
    Acknowledgments
    • While this project was an amazing accomplishment, none of it would have been even remotely possible without the help of the staff in the Force Lab; Barrett, John, and Russ. All three of them were there by my side helping me every step of the way, whether it be securing the appropriate materials for the project, and helping me to understand how they work, assisting me with the utilization of the machinery required to make some of the parts that I needed, or helping me to come up with brand new designs to accommodate the needs that that arose as we encountered new problems. All of them were extremely helpful and played our major role in helping me to complete my project not only on time, but to meet and even exceed many of the project requirements. A special thanks to Barrett, John, and Russ for their hard work, commitment, and assistance with this project. , Dr. Christopher Martin played a critical role and helping me to comprehend some of the complex mechanical applications of the parts being utilized for this project. Such as critiquing my designs and explaining physical and mathematical applications and relationships between different forces and momentums associated with designing the steering system and fitting the wheels. This all helped with designing the steering system in a way that makes the vehicle physically practical, while at the same time being as effective as possible and fitting within the specified parameters. I was greatly inspired by his level of intellect and ability to breakdown problems into small, comprehensible chunks that can be tackled one by one. I truly believe that not only was he a huge help with my project, but that he played a critical role in he played a critical role in confirming to me that mechanical engineering is the correct career path for me.
  • Added Creator Alvin Spruill
  • Updated Description Show Changes
    Description
    • As a perspective mechanical engineer looking to be among those in the forefront of developing and innovating electric vehicle technology, I am consistently looking for ways to expand my knowledge how electric motors work, problems associated with electric Motors, and implementation of electric Motors and the automotive industry. So it will come as no surprise that for my final project Engineering and Design 100 Course last Fall semester, I decided to go above and beyond what was required of me in pursuit of knowledge and experience in working with electric motors. I would build my own remote-controlled vehicle. This RC vehicle is modeled after what are my most anticipated upcoming electric vehicles, the Tesla Cyber Truck. It features matching aesthetic components, paired with practical functionality. The vehicle is capable of moving both forward and backward, as well as turning left and right, utilizing a steering system modeled after that which can be seen in real life cars. This project challenged me not only academically, but intellectually as well as I had to endure the process of designing, failing, learning, and then improving. From this project, I was able to learn a bit about electric motors, how the steering system in our cars work, as well as some basic machining skills. However, the most important thing that I have taken away from this project is, that everything has a process, and it means to be an engineer. When I first started the project, I thought that it would be as simple as taking a body, slapping some wheels on it attached to a motor and using a serval to help with the steering. boy was out so wrong, now looking back on it I'm glad that I was wrong, because through my ignorance of the true difficulty and scale of the project, I was able to walk out of it with a new understanding of what it means to be an engineer.
    • As a perspective mechanical engineer looking to be among those in the forefront of developing and innovating electric vehicle technology, I am consistently looking for ways to expand my knowledge how electric motors work, problems associated with electric Motors, and implementation of electric Motors and the automotive industry. So it will come as no surprise that for my final project Engineering and Design 100 Course last Fall semester, I decided to go above and beyond what was required of me in pursuit of knowledge and experience in working with electric motors. I would build my own remote-controlled vehicle. This RC vehicle is modeled after what are my most anticipated upcoming electric vehicles, the Tesla Cyber Truck. It features matching aesthetic components, paired with practical functionality. The vehicle is capable of moving both forward and backward, as well as turning left and right, utilizing a steering system modeled after that which can be seen in real life cars. This project challenged me not only academically, but intellectually as well as I had to endure the process of designing, failing, learning, and then improving. From this project, I was able to learn a bit about electric motors, how the steering system in our cars work, as well as some basic machining skills. However, the most important thing that I have taken away from this project is, that everything has a process, and it means to be an engineer. When I first started the project, I thought that it would be as simple as taking a body, slapping some wheels on it attached to a motor and using a serval to help with the steering. boy was out so wrong, now looking back on it I'm glad that I was wrong, because through my ignorance of the true difficulty and scale of the project, I was able to walk out of it with a new understanding of what it means to be an engineer.
  • Added RC VEHICLE FROM SCRATCH.pdf
  • Updated License Show Changes
    License
    • https://www.gnu.org/licenses/gpl.html
  • Published
  • Updated
  • Updated