The Disruptive Behavior Disorders Rating Scale: Updated Factor Structure, Measurement Invariance, and National Caregiver Norms

OBJECTIVE: To provide the first caregiver-report national norms for the Disruptive Behavior Disorders Rating Scale (DBDRS) and an updated evaluation of its factor structure and measurement invariance across child sex, informant sex, and child age.

METHODS: Caregivers of children aged 5-12 years (N = 962) based in the United States completed the four DBDRS subscales. Using both severity scoring and dichotomous scoring procedures, confirmatory factor analyses supported a four-factor model of inattentive and hyperactive/impulsive symptoms, oppositional defiant symptoms, and conduct disorder symptoms.

RESULTS: Measurement invariance was supported, indicating that the DBDRS functions similarly across demographic characteristics. Boys were reported to have more severe symptoms than girls (Cohen's d = 0.33 [inattention], 0.30 [hyperactivity/impulsivity], 0.18 [oppositional defiant disorder], 0.14 [conduct disorder]), female caregivers rated ADHD symptoms as more severe than male caregivers (ds = 0.15 and 0.19 for inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity, respectively), and older children were reported to experience more inattention than younger children (d = 0.18). Overall, group differences were modest in magnitude.

CONCLUSION: This psychometric study supports the continued use of the DBDRS in school-aged youth and will enhance the measure's clinical and research utility by providing the first caregiver-report norms.

This is a pre-copyedited, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in Journal of Pediatric Psychology following peer review. The version of record [The Disruptive Behavior Disorders Rating Scale: Updated Factor Structure, Measurement Invariance, and National Caregiver Norms. Journal of Pediatric Psychology 48, 5 p468-478 (2023)] is available online at: https://doi.org/10.1093/jpepsy/jsad006.

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Work Title The Disruptive Behavior Disorders Rating Scale: Updated Factor Structure, Measurement Invariance, and National Caregiver Norms
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Open Access
Creators
  1. Whitney Fosco
  2. Dara E. Babinski
  3. Daniel A. Waschbusch
Keyword
  1. ADHD
  2. Inattention
  3. Hyperactivity
  4. Externalizing behavior
  5. Norms
  6. Parent
  7. Caregiver
License In Copyright (Rights Reserved)
Work Type Article
Publisher
  1. Journal of Pediatric Psychology
Publication Date March 6, 2023
Publisher Identifier (DOI)
  1. https://doi.org/10.1093/jpepsy/jsad006
Deposited January 18, 2024

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Version 1
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  • Created
  • Added DBD_manuscript_accepted_version_20230126-1.pdf
  • Added Creator Whitney Fosco
  • Added Creator Dara E. Babinski
  • Added Creator Daniel A. Waschbusch
  • Published
  • Updated Keyword, Description Show Changes
    Keyword
    • ADHD, Inattention, Hyperactivity, Externalizing behavior, Norms, Parent, Caregiver
    Description
    • OBJECTIVE: To provide the first caregiver-report national norms for the Disruptive Behavior Disorders Rating Scale (DBDRS) and an updated evaluation of its factor structure and measurement invariance across child sex, informant sex, and child age. METHODS: Caregivers of children aged 5-12 years (N = 962) based in the United States completed the four DBDRS subscales. Using both severity scoring and dichotomous scoring procedures, confirmatory factor analyses supported a four-factor model of inattentive and hyperactive/impulsive symptoms, oppositional defiant symptoms, and conduct disorder symptoms. RESULTS: Measurement invariance was supported, indicating that the DBDRS functions similarly across demographic characteristics. Boys were reported to have more severe symptoms than girls (Cohen's d = 0.33 [inattention], 0.30 [hyperactivity/impulsivity], 0.18 [oppositional defiant disorder], 0.14 [conduct disorder]), female caregivers rated ADHD symptoms as more severe than male caregivers (ds = 0.15 and 0.19 for inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity, respectively), and older children were reported to experience more inattention than younger children (d = 0.18). Overall, group differences were modest in magnitude. CONCLUSION: This psychometric study supports the continued use of the DBDRS in school-aged youth and will enhance the measure's clinical and research utility by providing the first caregiver-report norms.
    • OBJECTIVE: To provide the first caregiver-report national norms for the Disruptive Behavior Disorders Rating Scale (DBDRS) and an updated evaluation of its factor structure and measurement invariance across child sex, informant sex, and child age.
    • METHODS: Caregivers of children aged 5-12 years (N = 962) based in the United States completed the four DBDRS subscales. Using both severity scoring and dichotomous scoring procedures, confirmatory factor analyses supported a four-factor model of inattentive and hyperactive/impulsive symptoms, oppositional defiant symptoms, and conduct disorder symptoms.
    • RESULTS: Measurement invariance was supported, indicating that the DBDRS functions similarly across demographic characteristics. Boys were reported to have more severe symptoms than girls (Cohen's d = 0.33 [inattention], 0.30 [hyperactivity/impulsivity], 0.18 [oppositional defiant disorder], 0.14 [conduct disorder]), female caregivers rated ADHD symptoms as more severe than male caregivers (ds = 0.15 and 0.19 for inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity, respectively), and older children were reported to experience more inattention than younger children (d = 0.18). Overall, group differences were modest in magnitude.
    • CONCLUSION: This psychometric study supports the continued use of the DBDRS in school-aged youth and will enhance the measure's clinical and research utility by providing the first caregiver-report norms.
  • Updated