Addressing Borderline Personality Disorder in Females with ADHD

Although the majority of research conducted on attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has been focused on males, within the past two decades there has been an increasing focus on examining the correlates and long-term course of ADHD in females (Hinshaw, 2002; Tung et al., 2016). For the most part, this work has shown that females with ADHD experience many of the same adversities as males with ADHD (Babinski et al., 2011; Williamson & Johnston, 2015). However, there is also accumulating evidence pointing to heightened risk for social-emotional difficulties among females relative to males with the disorder. Numerous studies show that females with ADHD experience broader and more severe peer difficulties relative to boys with ADHD (Babinski & Waschbusch, 2016; Becker et al., 2013; Mikami & Lorenzi, 2011). Additionally, females with ADHD demonstrate higher rates of depression, self-harm, and suicide attempts relative to males with ADHD (Babinski, Neely, et al., 2020; Chronis-Tuscano et al., 2010; Owens et al., 2017). For example, in the Berkley ADHD Girls Study, a prospective longitudinal study of 140 females diagnosed with ADHD in childhood and 88 comparison females without ADHD, 67.9% of females who experienced persistent symptoms of ADHD into adulthood had been diagnosed with depression, 27.5% reported a suicide attempt, and 66.0% reported having engaged in non-suicidal self-injury. These numbers are staggering, as they are more than double those reported in the general population (Kessler et al., 2003; Nock et al., 2008), and they suggest increasing difficulty for females with ADHD as they reach adolescence and adulthood.

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Work Title Addressing Borderline Personality Disorder in Females with ADHD
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Open Access
Creators
  1. D E Babinski
  2. Daniel A Waschbusch
Keyword
  1. Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder
  2. Borderline personality disorder
  3. Female
License In Copyright (Rights Reserved)
Work Type Article
Publisher
  1. The ADHD Report
Publication Date February 2021
Publisher Identifier (DOI)
  1. https://doi.org/10.1521/adhd.2021.29.1.1
Deposited February 17, 2023

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  • Created
  • Added ADHD_and_BPD_article_for_ADHD_report_OA.docx
  • Added Creator D E Babinski
  • Added Creator Daniel A Waschbusch
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  • Updated Keyword, Publication Date Show Changes
    Keyword
    • Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, Borderline personality disorder, Female
    Publication Date
    • 2021-01-01
    • 2021-02
  • Updated Description Show Changes
    Description
    • Addressing Borderline Personality Disorder in Females with ADHD
    • Although the majority of research conducted on attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has been focused on males, within the past two decades there has been an increasing focus on examining the correlates and long-term course of ADHD in females (Hinshaw, 2002; Tung et al., 2016). For the most part, this work has shown that females with ADHD experience many of the same adversities as males with ADHD (Babinski et al., 2011; Williamson & Johnston, 2015). However, there is also accumulating evidence pointing to heightened risk for social-emotional difficulties among females relative to males with the disorder. Numerous studies show that females with ADHD experience broader and more severe peer difficulties relative to boys with ADHD (Babinski & Waschbusch, 2016; Becker et al., 2013; Mikami & Lorenzi, 2011). Additionally, females with ADHD demonstrate higher rates of depression, self-harm, and suicide attempts relative to males with ADHD (Babinski, Neely, et al., 2020; Chronis-Tuscano et al., 2010; Owens et al., 2017). For example, in the Berkley ADHD Girls Study, a prospective longitudinal study of 140 females diagnosed with ADHD in childhood and 88 comparison females without ADHD, 67.9% of females who experienced persistent symptoms of ADHD into adulthood had been diagnosed with depression, 27.5% reported a suicide attempt, and 66.0% reported having engaged in non-suicidal self-injury. These numbers are staggering, as they are more than double those reported in the general population (Kessler et al., 2003; Nock et al., 2008), and they suggest increasing difficulty for females with ADHD as they reach adolescence and adulthood.