Ex vivo LPS-stimulated cytokine production is associated with cortisol curves in response to acute psychosocial stress

Ex vivo LPS-stimulated cytokine production is associated with cortisol curves in response to acute psychosocial stress Kristin M. Davis1, Christopher G. Engeland1,2, and Kyle W. Murdock1 Department of Biobehavioral Health1, The Pennsylvania State University College of Nursing2, The Pennsylvania State University Abstract Background Empirical and theoretical evidence suggest that because of the co-evolution of the endocrine and immune response systems, different types of stressors may lead to similar levels of physiological activation. The present analyses examined associations between two physiological stress responses: the cortisol response to an acute laboratory stressor and ex vivo lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulated inflammatory cytokine production. Methods Healthy middle-aged adults (N=65) completed testing at two appointments, two weeks apart. Blood was collected at each appointment to measure circulating inflammatory cytokine levels and stimulated inflammatory cytokine production after 4 and 24 hours of incubation with LPS. A cumulative standardized composite measure of inflammation was calculated using the cytokines interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and interferon-γ (IFN-γ). At visit two, after the blood draw, participants completed the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST); saliva samples were collected before and after to generate cortisol response curves (area under the curve with respect to ground [AUCG] and increase/decrease [AUCI]). Results AUCG was significantly associated with stimulated cytokine production at visit 2 after both 4 hours (B=6.89; p=0.007) and 24 hours (B=7.50; p=0.005) of incubation, controlling for age, sex, and BMI. AUCI was also significantly associated with stimulated cytokine production at visit 2 after 4 hours (B=6.28; p=0.004) and 24 hours (B=6.16; p=0.007) of incubation, controlling for age, sex, and BMI. Stimulated inflammatory cytokine production was strongly correlated across the two visits (2 weeks apart) after 4 hours of incubation (r=0.80, p<0.001) and after 24 hours (r=0.80, p<0.001). Within each visit, stimulated cytokine production after 4 hours was significantly correlated with stimulated inflammation at 24 hours (r=0.93-0.94, p<0.05) Conclusions These results suggest that LPS-stimulated inflammatory cytokine production and the cortisol response to the TSST contain comparable information about acute human physiological stress responses. Moreover, measurement of stimulated cytokines was highly stable across a two-week time period whether measured after 4 or 24 hours of incubation with LPS.

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Work Title Ex vivo LPS-stimulated cytokine production is associated with cortisol curves in response to acute psychosocial stress
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Open Access
Creators
  1. Kristin Marie Davis
  2. Christopher Gerald Engeland
  3. Kyle Murdock
Keyword
  1. stress response; cortisol; inflammation; ex vivo inflammatory response
License In Copyright (Rights Reserved)
Work Type Article
Publisher
  1. Psychoneuroendocrinology
Publication Date 2020
Publisher Identifier (DOI)
  1. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.psyneuen.2020.104863
Deposited February 26, 2021

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