THE SIXTEENTH-CENTURY EMPIRICAL DISPROOF OF PTOLEMAIC GEOCENTRISM

In 1573, Thomas Digges published a book entitled Alae seu Scalae Mathematicae and in 2023 we celebrate the 450th anniversary of its publication. The book was prompted by the apparition of the New Star of 1572, which Digges shows does not change position in the sky. He supplies its distances from some nearby stars in Cassiopeia, but the remainder of the book has long been under-valued. It presents a "new and unheard-of method" of ascertaining diurnal parallaxes of planets, yet Digges applies the theoretical developments only in illustrative examples. However, three years later in 1576 in an essay "A Perfit Description of the Caelestiall Orbes," Digges makes the astounding claim that he has measured parallaxes of planets with sufficient accuracy to show that they do not circle the Earth at a constant distance but have some other center or centers. This paper examines Digges’ claim of an empirical disproof of geocentrism in the sixteenth century and its support for heliocentrism.

Files

Metadata

Work Title THE SIXTEENTH-CENTURY EMPIRICAL DISPROOF OF PTOLEMAIC GEOCENTRISM
Access
Open Access
Creators
  1. Peter D. Usher
License CC0 1.0 (Public Domain Dedication)
Work Type Research Paper
Publication Date October 25, 2023
Publisher Identifier (DOI)
  1. https://www.sciengine.com/JAHH/doi/10.3724/SP.J.1440-2807.2023.09.65
Deposited April 03, 2024

Versions

Analytics

Collections

This resource is currently not in any collection.

Work History

Version 1
published

  • Created
  • Updated
  • Updated Publisher Identifier (DOI), Description, Publication Date Show Changes
    Publisher Identifier (DOI)
    • https://www.sciengine.com/JAHH/doi/10.3724/SP.J.1440-2807.2023.09.65
    Description
    • In 1573, Thomas Digges published a book entitled Alae seu Scalae Mathematicae and in 2023 we celebrate the 450th anniversary of its publication. The book was prompted by the apparition of the New Star of 1572, which Digges shows does not change position in the sky. He supplies its distances from some nearby stars in Cassiopeia, but the remainder of the book has long been under-valued. It presents a "new and unheard-of method" of ascertaining diurnal parallaxes of planets, yet
    • Digges applies the theoretical developments only in illustrative examples. However, three years later in 1576 in an essay "A Perfit Description of the Caelestiall Orbes," Digges makes the astounding claim that he has measured parallaxes of planets with sufficient accuracy to show that they do not circle the Earth at a constant distance but have some other center or centers. This paper examines Digges’ claim of an empirical disproof of geocentrism in the sixteenth century and its support for heliocentrism.
    Publication Date
    • 2023-10-25
  • Added Creator Peter D. Usher
  • Added EMPIRICAL DISPROOF PAPER I.pdf
  • Updated License Show Changes
    License
    • http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/
  • Published
  • Updated

Version 2
published

  • Created
  • Updated Description Show Changes
    Description
    • In 1573, Thomas Digges published a book entitled Alae seu Scalae Mathematicae and in 2023 we celebrate the 450th anniversary of its publication. The book was prompted by the apparition of the New Star of 1572, which Digges shows does not change position in the sky. He supplies its distances from some nearby stars in Cassiopeia, but the remainder of the book has long been under-valued. It presents a "new and unheard-of method" of ascertaining diurnal parallaxes of planets, yet
    • Digges applies the theoretical developments only in illustrative examples. However, three years later in 1576 in an essay "A Perfit Description of the Caelestiall Orbes," Digges makes the astounding claim that he has measured parallaxes of planets with sufficient accuracy to show that they do not circle the Earth at a constant distance but have some other center or centers. This paper examines Digges’ claim of an empirical disproof of geocentrism in the sixteenth century and its support for heliocentrism.
  • Published
  • Updated