Unmet health care needs in children of parents with poor self-rated mental health: justification for a “think-family” approach

Associations between parents’ self-rated mental health status and children’s (0–17 years) unmet health care needs were examined in the 2019–20 National Survey of Children’s Health. Compared to parents with excellent/very good mental health, parents with poor/fair mental health were more likely to report children as having unmet health care needs, more missed school days due to illness/injury, and poor/fair general health. Problems paying for health care, transportation or childcare, lack of parenting support, parenting stress and parents’ own physical health problems were identified as barriers. Parents with poor mental health may benefit from programs that provide parenting support.

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Children's Health Care on 2022-11-25, available online: https://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/02739615.2022.2148670.

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Work Title Unmet health care needs in children of parents with poor self-rated mental health: justification for a “think-family” approach
Access
Open Access
Creators
  1. Jane T. Hatzell
  2. Sarah A. Gioia
  3. Lori A. Francis
Keyword
  1. Child health
  2. Parenting
  3. Parental mental health
  4. Parenting support
  5. Health care utilization
License CC BY-NC 4.0 (Attribution-NonCommercial)
Work Type Article
Publisher
  1. Children's Health Care
Publication Date November 25, 2022
Publisher Identifier (DOI)
  1. https://doi.org/10.1080/02739615.2022.2148670
Deposited November 21, 2023

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Version 1
published

  • Created
  • Added Revised_Manuscript_with_author_details_CLEAN-1.pdf
  • Added Creator Jane T. Hatzell
  • Added Creator Sarah A. Gioia
  • Added Creator Lori A. Francis
  • Published
  • Updated Keyword Show Changes
    Keyword
    • Child health , Parenting, Parental mental health, Parenting support, Health care utilization