Effects of Skin-to-Skin Contact

This project was awarded 1st place in the Research Project category

Skin-to-skin contact (SSC) has been proven to be beneficial to both the mother and the newborn after delivery. The current standard of care indicates SSC for premature infants only unless specified in the birth plan. The purpose of this research is to evaluate the impact SSC has on the vital stabilization of newborns compared to the traditional method of placing the newborn on the warming station for assessments and care. A search for literature was conducted using ProQuest and PubMed using keywords including skin-to-skin contact, temperature stabilization, and vaginal delivery. Eight research articles were reviewed. The research found that SSC between the mother and newborn resulted in vital signs that stabilized faster, an increase in bonding time, and maximized breastfeeding opportunity.

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Work Title Effects of Skin-to-Skin Contact
Access
Open Access
Creators
  1. Kylee Hoover
  2. Mackenzie Martin
  3. Alexis Sieg
Keyword
  1. Penn State Mont Alto Academic Festival 2021
  2. Undergraduate Research
License CC BY 4.0 (Attribution)
Work Type Poster
Acknowledgments
  1. Faculty Mentors: Dr. Stephanie Unger & Dr. Anne Devney
Publication Date April 16, 2021
Related URLs
Deposited April 10, 2021

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Version 1
published

  • Created
  • Updated Acknowledgments Show Changes
    Acknowledgments
    • Faculty Mentors: Dr. Stephanie Unger & Dr. Anne Devney
  • Added Creator Kylee Hoover
  • Added Creator Mackenzie Martin
  • Added Creator Alexis Sieg
  • Added Skin to Skin Contact.pdf
  • Updated License Show Changes
    License
    • https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
  • Published
  • Updated

Version 2
published

  • Created
  • Updated Description Show Changes
    Description
    • *This project was awarded 1st place in the Research Project category*
    • Skin-to-skin contact (SSC) has been proven to be beneficial to both the mother and the newborn after delivery. The current standard of care indicates SSC for premature infants only unless specified in the birth plan. The purpose of this research is to evaluate the impact SSC has on the vital stabilization of newborns compared to the traditional method of placing the newborn on the warming station for assessments and care. A search for literature was conducted using ProQuest and PubMed using keywords including skin-to-skin contact, temperature stabilization, and vaginal delivery. Eight research articles were reviewed. The research found that SSC between the mother and newborn resulted in vital signs that stabilized faster, an increase in bonding time, and maximized breastfeeding opportunity.
  • Published
  • Updated