Correlated color temperature: Use and limitations

Correlated color temperature (CCT) is a one-dimensional metric that aims to quantify the perceived visual quality of nominal white light sources. It is often used as a proxy for the color quality of light sources due to its ease of use. However, CCT lacks the accuracy in communicating color information for research purposes. Two light sources with identical CCTs can appear perceptually different, and these differences are not estimated by CCT due to the loss of information caused by reducing spectral power distribution of light sources into a one-dimensional metric. Using supplemental metrics in addition to CCT, providing the absolute spectral power distribution of light sources in graphical and tabular form, and documenting and accounting for potential confounding factors, such as chromatic adaptation, can increase the validity of research results, improve the repeatability of studies, and help address replication concerns.

D Durmus, Correlated color temperature: Use and limitations, Lighting Research & Technology (, ) pp. . Copyright © 2021. DOI: 10.1177/14771535211034330. Users who receive access to an article through a repository are reminded that the article is protected by copyright and reuse is restricted to non-commercial and no derivative uses. Users may also download and save a local copy of an article accessed in an institutional repository for the user's personal reference. For permission to reuse an article, please follow our Process for Requesting Permission.

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Work Title Correlated color temperature: Use and limitations
Access
Open Access
Creators
  1. D Durmus
License In Copyright (Rights Reserved)
Work Type Article
Publisher
  1. SAGE Publications
Publication Date July 25, 2021
Publisher Identifier (DOI)
  1. 10.1177/14771535211034330
Source
  1. Lighting Research & Technology
Deposited May 27, 2022

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    Description
    • <jats:p> Correlated color temperature (CCT) is a one-dimensional metric that aims to quantify the perceived visual quality of nominal white light sources. It is often used as a proxy for the color quality of light sources due to its ease of use. However, CCT lacks the accuracy in communicating color information for research purposes. Two light sources with identical CCTs can appear perceptually different, and these differences are not estimated by CCT due to the loss of information caused by reducing spectral power distribution of light sources into a one-dimensional metric. Using supplemental metrics in addition to CCT, providing the absolute spectral power distribution of light sources in graphical and tabular form, and documenting and accounting for potential confounding factors, such as chromatic adaptation, can increase the validity of research results, improve the repeatability of studies, and help address replication concerns. </jats:p>
    • Correlated color temperature (CCT) is a one-dimensional metric that aims to quantify the perceived visual quality of nominal white light sources. It is often used as a proxy for the color quality of light sources due to its ease of use. However, CCT lacks the accuracy in communicating color information for research purposes. Two light sources with identical CCTs can appear perceptually different, and these differences are not estimated by CCT due to the loss of information caused by reducing spectral power distribution of light sources into a one-dimensional metric. Using supplemental metrics in addition to CCT, providing the absolute spectral power distribution of light sources in graphical and tabular form, and documenting and accounting for potential confounding factors, such as chromatic adaptation, can increase the validity of research results, improve the repeatability of studies, and help address replication concerns.
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