The use of adjunct displays to facilitate comprehension of causal relationships in expository text

We examined whether making cause and effect relationships explicit with an adjunct display improves different facets of text comprehension compared to a text only condition. In two experiments, participants read a text and then either studied a causal diagram, studied a list, or reread the text. In both experiments, readers who studied the adjunct displays better recalled the steps in the causal sequences, answered more problem-solving transfer items correctly, and answered more questions about transitive relationships between causes and effects correctly than those who reread the text. These findings supported the causal explication hypothesis, which states that adjunct displays improve comprehension of causal relationships by explicitly representing a text’s causal structure, which helps the reader better comprehend causal relationships.

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Work Title The use of adjunct displays to facilitate comprehension of causal relationships in expository text
Access
Open Access
Creators
  1. Matthew McCrudden
  2. Gregory Schraw
  3. Stephen Lehman
Keyword
  1. Causal relationships
  2. Expository text comprehension
  3. Adjunct displays
License In Copyright (Rights Reserved)
Work Type Article
Publisher
  1. Instructional Science
Publication Date July 25, 2007
Publisher Identifier (DOI)
  1. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11251-007-9036-3
Deposited August 09, 2023

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Version 1
published

  • Created
  • Added IS_2009_Adjuncts.pdf
  • Added Creator Matthew McCrudden
  • Added Creator Gregory Schraw
  • Added Creator Stephen Lehman
  • Published
  • Updated Keyword, Description, Publication Date Show Changes
    Keyword
    • Causal relationships, Expository text comprehension, Adjunct displays
    Description
    • x
    • We examined whether making cause and effect relationships explicit with an adjunct display improves different facets of text comprehension compared to a text only condition. In two experiments, participants read a text and then either studied a causal diagram, studied a list, or reread the text. In both experiments, readers who studied the adjunct displays better recalled the steps in the causal sequences, answered more problem-solving transfer items correctly, and answered more questions about transitive relationships between causes and effects correctly than those who reread the text. These findings supported the causal explication hypothesis, which states that adjunct displays improve comprehension of causal relationships by explicitly representing a text’s causal structure, which helps the reader better comprehend causal relationships.
    Publication Date
    • 2009-01-01
    • 2007-07-25
  • Updated