Linking across the lines: Student Voice works-in-progress

Over the last several years, there has been a proliferation of terms to describe efforts to ensure that students have more active roles in conversations about and approaches to education: student voice, student-teacher partnership, youth empowerment, and the list goes on. All of these terms describe work focused on students as active participants and partners in educational practice, research, and reform.

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Work Title Linking across the lines: Student Voice works-in-progress
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Open Access
Creators
  1. Alison Cook-Sather
  2. Dana L Mitra
License In Copyright (Rights Reserved)
Work Type Article
Publisher
  1. Connect: supporting student participation
Publication Date August 2013
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Deposited March 01, 2024

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Version 1
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  • Created
  • Added 2013_Linking_across_the_lines_Connect.pdf
  • Added Creator A Cook-Sather
  • Added Creator Dana L Mitra
  • Published
  • Updated Work Title Show Changes
    Work Title
    • Linking across the links: Student voice works-in-progres
    • Linking across the lines: Student Voice works-in-progress
  • Updated Description, Related URLs, Publication Date Show Changes
    Description
    • the work of Student Councils that was evident through
    • student discussions at the VicSRC Congress. I’ve noted in the
    • past how students arrive at this event constrained by their own
    • perceptions of ‘what it is that SRCs do’. So many talk initially just
    • about fundraising, socials or representing the school at public
    • events. But for the last few years, the VicSRC has started its
    • conference by asking these students to imagine what schools
    • could be like. And the ideas pour out. There are visions, dreams
    • and hopes, but also frustrations - at the limitations that students
    • see in schools, at the restricted roles that students play. And
    • at the constrained perceptions of what students and their
    • organisations can do. However, once convinced that they will
    • be seriously listened to, students talk about curriculum and
    • pedagogy, about self-managed learning, about assessment and
    • reporting, about ways to overcome stereotypes - and ways to
    • deal with the rules and attitudes that govern their lives. These
    • issues are refl ected in the decisions they then make about the
    • work program for the VicSRC for the year ahead (see page 17).
    • Several schools have also written about their Student
    • Councils in their applications for the VicSRC’s annual SRC
    • Awards. Some of these stories are in this issue, and others will
    • hopefully appear in Connect 203 in October.
    • The Cambridge Student Voice Conference was an
    • important international gathering of people whose practices,
    • research, writing and thinking are in this area. But where do such
    • discussions go – beyond being a nice time to talk with people
    • who understand the language and concepts? I was privileged
    • to be part of planning around integrating our work - and we’ll
    • see where the set of ‘working groups’ takes us over the next
    • year (see pages 14-16 for Dana Mitra’s notes of the discussion). The
    • fourth such Conference – and the last one planned in this series
    • – will be held in June 2014, and will seriously reassess this way
    • forward. Might you be there?
    • This issue of Connect also starts with another ‘work in
    • progress’ about student voice – from Mornington Special
    • Developmental School. Working in a setting whose students
    • have not traditionally been recognised as ‘capable’ of having
    • any voice, this important initiative is exploring practices that
    • have implications for all of us. Read on and enjoy ... and tell us
    • what you’re doing too.
    • Over the last several years, there has been a proliferation of terms to describe efforts to ensure that students have more active roles in conversations about and approaches to education: student voice, student-teacher partnership, youth empowerment, and the list goes on. All of these terms describe work focused on students as active participants and partners in educational practice, research, and reform.
    Related URLs
    • https://research.acer.edu.au/connect/
    Publication Date
    • 2013-01-01
    • 2013-08
  • Renamed Creator Alison Cook-Sather Show Changes
    • A Cook-Sather
    • Alison Cook-Sather
  • Updated