The relationship between the perceived motivational climate in elite collegiate sport and athlete psychological coping skills

Psychological coping skills in sport are believed to be central to athlete performance and well-being. This study examined the relationship between the perceived motivational climate in elite collegiate sport teams and player psychological coping skills use. Division I athletes completed a questionnaire examining their perceptions of how caring, task-, and ego-involving their teams were and their use of sport specific psychological coping skills (i.e., coping with adversity, peaking under pressure, goal setting/mental preparation, concentration, freedom from worry, confidence/achievement motivation, and coachability). Structural equation modeling revealed positive relationships between perceptions of a task-involving climate and confidence/achievement motivation (β = 0.42) and goal setting/mental preparation (β = 0.27). Caring climate perceptions were positively associated with coachability (β = 0.34). These findings illustrate how encouraging athletes and coaches to create a caring, task-involving climate may facilitate athletes’ use of psychological coping skills and set athletes up to perform their best and have a positive sporting experience.

Accepted author manuscript version reprinted, by permission, from Journal of Clinical Sport Psychology, 2021, (): 1-17, https://doi.org/10.1123/jcsp.2020-0002. © Human Kinetics, Inc.

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Work Title The relationship between the perceived motivational climate in elite collegiate sport and athlete psychological coping skills
Access
Open Access
Creators
  1. Mary D. Fry
  2. Candace M. Hogue
  3. Susumu Iwasaki
  4. Gloria B. Solomon
Keyword
  1. Achievement goal perspective theory
  2. Psychological coping skills
  3. Division I athletes
  4. Mental skills
  5. Collegiate athletes
License In Copyright (Rights Reserved)
Work Type Article
Publisher
  1. Human Kinetics
Publication Date July 21, 2021
Publisher Identifier (DOI)
  1. 10.1123/jcsp.2020-0002
Source
  1. Journal of Clinical Sport Psychology
Deposited May 23, 2022

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Version 1
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  • Created
  • Added fry hogue iwasaki solomon 2022-1.docx
  • Added Creator Mary D. Fry
  • Added Creator Candace M. Hogue
  • Added Creator Susumu Iwasaki
  • Added Creator Gloria B. Solomon
  • Published
  • Updated Keyword, Description, Publication Date Show Changes
    Keyword
    • Achievement goal perspective theory, Psychological coping skills, Division I athletes, Mental skills, Collegiate athletes
    Description
    • <jats:p>Psychological coping skills in sport are believed to be central to athlete performance and well-being. This study examined the relationship between the perceived motivational climate in elite collegiate sport teams and player psychological coping skills use. Division I athletes (<jats:italic>N</jats:italic> = 467) completed a questionnaire examining their perceptions of how caring, task-, and ego-involving their teams were and their use of sport specific psychological coping skills (i.e., coping with adversity, peaking under pressure, goal setting/mental preparation, concentration, freedom from worry, confidence/achievement motivation, and coachability). Structural equation modeling revealed positive relationships between perceptions of a task-involving climate and confidence/achievement motivation (β = 0.42) and goal setting/mental preparation (β = 0.27). Caring climate perceptions were positively associated with coachability (β = 0.34). These findings illustrate how encouraging athletes and coaches to create a caring, task-involving climate may facilitate athletes’ use of psychological coping skills and set athletes up to perform their best and have a positive sporting experience.</jats:p>
    • Psychological coping skills in sport are believed to be central to athlete performance and well-being. This study examined the relationship between the perceived motivational climate in elite collegiate sport teams and player psychological coping skills use. Division I athletes completed a questionnaire examining their perceptions of how caring, task-, and ego-involving their teams were and their use of sport specific psychological coping skills (i.e., coping with adversity, peaking under pressure, goal setting/mental preparation, concentration, freedom from worry, confidence/achievement motivation, and coachability). Structural equation modeling revealed positive relationships between perceptions of a task-involving climate and confidence/achievement motivation (β = 0.42) and goal setting/mental preparation (β = 0.27). Caring climate perceptions were positively associated with coachability (β = 0.34). These findings illustrate how encouraging athletes and coaches to create a caring, task-involving climate may facilitate athletes’ use of psychological coping skills and set athletes up to perform their best and have a positive sporting experience.
    Publication Date
    • 2021-12-01
    • 2021-07-21
  • Updated