Media Multitasking in the Classroom Public

Problematic Mobile Phone Use and Executive Function as Predictors of Texting in the Classroom

The purpose of the present study was to investigate the relation among texting in the classroom, problematic mobile phone use, and executive function in college students. A sample of 170 college students completed questionnaires to assess the frequency of texting in the classroom as well as the levels of problematic mobile phone use and executive functioning. Hierarchical regressions were performed to evaluate the relative contributions of problematic mobile phone use and executive function in predicting the frequency of texting in the classroom. The results show that students’ degree of problematic mobile phone use was a significant predictor of the frequency of texting in the classroom after controlling for age, gender, and years of education. The results also show that students’ level of a subscale of executive function, impulse control, was a significant predictor of the frequency of texting in the classroom over and above problematic mobile phone use after controlling for the demographic variables. These results support a general conclusion that problematic mobile phone use and executive functions are important factors in texting in class.

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