Occurrence of Pharmaceutical Compounds in Source and Treated Drinking Water Public

The occurrence of pharmaceuticals in various surface water sources raises concern over their removal through conventional drinking water treatment processes. A monitoring study of 7 pharmaceutical compounds (acetaminophen, ampicillin, caffeine, naproxen, ofloxacin, sulfamethoxazole, and trimethoprim) in 6 conventional drinking water treatment plants (DWTPs) was performed. Monthly to bimonthly scale sampling was conducted during a one-year study period from raw untreated waters used as drinking water sources, intermediate treatment steps and finished drinking water distributed to consumers.

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GENERAL INFORMATION

Occurrence of Pharmaceutical Compounds in Source and Treated Drinking Water

Author Information

Principal Investigator Contact Information
Name: Dr. Heather E. Gall, Assistant Professor
Institution:The Pennsylvania State University, Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering
Address:252 Agricultural Engineering Building
Shortlidge Road
University Park, PA 16802
Email:heg12@psu.edu

Associate or Co-investigator Contact Information
Name: Dr. Herschel Elliott, Professor
Institution:The Pennsylvania State University, Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering
Address:253 Agricultural Engineering Building
Shortlidge Road
University Park, PA 16802
Email:hae1@psu.edu

Associate or Co-investigator Contact Information
Name: Dr. John (Jack) Watson, Professor
Institution:The Pennsylvania State University, Department of Ecosystem Science and Management
Address:253 Agricultural Engineering Building
Shortlidge Road
University Park, PA 16802
Email:jackwatson@psu.edu

Associate or Co-investigator Contact Information
Name: Bryan Swistock, Senior Water Resources Extension Associate
Institution:The Pennsylvania State University, Department of Ecosystem Science and Management
Address:308 Forest Resources Building
University Park, PA 16802
Email:brs@psu.edu

Associate or Co-investigator Contact Information
Name: James A. Clark, Water Resources Extension Educator
Institution:The Pennsylvania State University
Address:
University Park, PA 16802
Email:jac20@psu.edu

Alternate Contact Information
Name:Faith A. Kibuye
Institution:The Pennsylvania State University, Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering
Address:229 Agricultural Engineering Building
Shortlidge Road
University Park, PA 16802
Email:faithkibuye@gmail.com

Abstract/Description of research:

The occurrence of pharmaceuticals in various surface water sources raises concern over their removal through conventional drinking water treatment processes. A monitoring study of 7 pharmaceutical compounds (acetaminophen, ampicillin, caffeine, naproxen, ofloxacin, sulfamethoxazole, and trimethoprim) in 6 conventional drinking water treatment plants (DWTPs) was performed. Monthly to bimonthly scale sampling was conducted during a one-year study period from raw untreated waters used as drinking water sources, intermediate treatment steps and finished drinking water distributed to consumers.

Date of data collection (single date, range, approximate date)

April 2016 through December 2017

Information about funding sources that supported the collection of the data

The Pennsylvania Sea Grant

SHARING/ACCESS INFORMATION

Licenses/restrictions placed on the data:

Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International

Links to publications that cite or use the data:

Links to other publicly accessible locations of the data:

Links/relationships to ancillary data sets:

Was data derived from another source?

N/A

Recommended citation for the data:

Kibuye, F.A., H.E. Gall, K.R. Elkin,2019. "Occurrence, fate and transport of emerging contaminants in drinking water supplies in the Susquehanna River Basin-Dataset."

DATA & FILE OVERVIEW

File List

  • A. Filename: Occurrence of Pharmaceutical Compounds in Source and Treated Drinking Water
  • B. Short description:
    This collection presents data on concentrations of various emerging contaminanst in untreated (raw) drinking watre, water collected from intermediate treatment steps, and finished water distributed to consumers. Sheet one provides a description of the study sites and each sheet after that represents data collected from each DWTP. Data on water quality indicators collected during each sampling trip is also presented for ach DWTP.

METHODOLOGICAL INFORMATION

Description of methods used for collection/generation of data:

  • All samples were collected and handled following EPA method 1694 (USEPA, 2007 Method 1694: Pharmaceuticals and personal care products in water, soil, sediment and biosolids by HPLC/MS/MS. US EPA Office of Water and Office of Science and Technology. EPA-821-R-08-002. Available at: https://www.epa.gov/sites/production/files/2015-10/documents/method16942007.pdf)

Methods for processing the data:

  • Water samples were filtered through a 0.22 um polyethersulfone (PES) syringe filter after which samples were concentrated from a 500 uL volume to 20 uL volume using an inline concentrator column Hypersil Gold aQ 20x2.1 mm 12um (ThermoFisher, Sunnyvale, CA) then injected onto a 100 x 2.1mm 3um Hypersil Gold analytical column. Data presented have been censored using field, travel and instrument blanks. All concentrations that were less than the method detection limits (MDL) have been represented as <MDL or <LOD (limit of detection). Concentrations or values of the analytes measured between the LOD and the limit of quantification (LOQ) were reported as one half of the LOQ.

Instrument- or software-specific information needed to interpret the data

  • The water samples were analyzed and quantified using a high-resolution accurate mass (HRAM) Q Exactive Orbitrap mass spectrometer (ThermoFisher Scientific, Bremen, Germany), interfaced to a chromatography system through a heated electrospray injection (HESI) source. More details on the methodology and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and mass spectrometer are summarized in: Kibuye, F.A., H.E. Gall, K.R. Elkin, B. Ayers, T.L. Veith, M. Miller, S. Jacob, K.R. Hayden, J.E. Watson, and H.A. Elliott. 2019. Fate of pharmaceuticals in a spray-irrigation system: From wastewater to groundwater. Science of the Total Environment, 654: 197-208. DOI: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.10.442

Standards and calibration information, if appropriate:

  • Insturment calibration information are summarized in: Kibuye, F.A., H.E. Gall, K.R. Elkin, B. Ayers, T.L. Veith, M. Miller, S. Jacob, K.R. Hayden, J.E. Watson, and H.A. Elliott. 2019. Fate of pharmaceuticals in a spray-irrigation system: From wastewater to groundwater. Science of the Total Environment, 654: 197-208. DOI: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.10.442

Environmental/experimental conditions:

  • A spatially distributed sampling technique was implemented whereby grab water samples from surface water sources and treated drinking water samples were collected at monthly and bimonthly scales from all six sites and samples from each set of sources (riverine and reservoir) were collected on the same day.

Describe any quality-assurance procedures performed on the data:

  • All samples were preserved on ice during transportation to laboratories for processing and analysis and stored at 4��C before processing within 48 h of collection. Data presented have been censored using field, travel and instrument blanks.

People involved with sample collection, processing, analysis and/or submission:

  • Individuals involved in sample collection include: Nicholas Kapelan, Emery Yurko, Jeremy Resseguie, Scott Sharp, John Prawzdik, Mike Barger, Ryan Troutman, Dave Richie, Scott Roads, Laura Walter, Richard Bitting, and Terry Patrick of the Pennsylvania American Water Company for their help and support in making this research possible. Faith Kibuye, Dr. Heather Gall, Dr. Odette Mina, Bryan Swistock, Daniel Leavy, Zach Klueber, Juan Li Zhu, Tulio de Souza, Melanie Norwin, Hongzeng Zhu, Megan Miller, Shannon Jacobs, and Joeseph Chandler from Penn State. Samples were analysed by Dr. Kyle Elkin of the USDA-ARS Pasture Systems and Watershed Management Research Unit.