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  1. Nelson, Signorella, & Botti (2016). Accent, gender, and perceived competence. Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences, 38(2), 166-185. [Download]

    Title: Nelson, Signorella, & Botti (2016). Accent, gender, and perceived competence. Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences, 38(2), 166-185.
    Depositor: Margaret Louise Signorella
    Creator:
    • Nelson, Larry R.
    • Signorella, Margaret L.
    • Botti, Karin G.
    Description: Those who use non-indigenous accented speech often experience prejudice and discrimination, and in the United States, those speaking with Spanish accents are likely to be impacted. In research on speaker perceptions by type of accent, however, the gender of the speaker or of the perceiver has received less attention. In the present study, the impact of accent (North American- vs. Spanish-accented English), gender of speaker, and gender of rater on perceptions of competence were investigated in a sample of U.S. undergraduates. Participants heard a recording by either a male or female speaker who spoke in English with either a North American or Spanish accent. As hypothesized, Spanish-accented speakers were more likely to be judged negatively, female speakers were more likely to receive negative assessments, and male participants were more likely to show bias related to accent. The neglect of gender in the study of accent bias is discussed.
    Keywords: language, accent, gender, prejudice
    Date Uploaded: 2016-04-17
  2. Grimes, Hough, & Signorella (2007). Email End Users and Spam: Relations of Gender and Age Group to Attitudes and Actions. Computers in Human Behavior, vol. 23. [Download]

    Title: Grimes, Hough, & Signorella (2007). Email End Users and Spam: Relations of Gender and Age Group to Attitudes and Actions. Computers in Human Behavior, vol. 23.
    Depositor: Margaret Louise Signorella
    Creator:
    • Grimes, Galen A.
    • Hough, Michelle G.
    • Signorella, Margaret L.
    Description: As the problem of spam email increases, we examined users’ attitudes toward and experience with spam as a function of gender and age. College-age, working-age, and retirement-age men and women were surveyed. Most respondents strongly disliked receiving spam yet took few actions against it. There were fewer gender differences than predicted, but age was a significant predictor of several responses. Retirement age men rated themselves as significantly lower in expertise than did working age men, and the oldest and youngest age groups took fewer actions against spam, used the computer less often, and spent fewer hours online than did the working age respondents. Older respondents were more likely than younger ones to report making a purchase as a result of a spam email and received the same amount of spam as other age groups in spite of lower overall use of the computer. The results suggest both that older computer users may be more vulnerable to spam, and that the usability of email for all users may be threatened by the inability of users to effectively take action against spam.
    Keywords: age, gender, attitudes, email, spam, Internet, consumer behavior
    Date Uploaded: 2015-07-19
  3. Signorella & Frieze (2008). Interrelations of Gender Schemas in Children and Adolescents: Attitudes, Preferences, and Self Perceptions. Social Behavior and Personality, vol. 36. [Download]

    Title: Signorella & Frieze (2008). Interrelations of Gender Schemas in Children and Adolescents: Attitudes, Preferences, and Self Perceptions. Social Behavior and Personality, vol. 36.
    Depositor: Margaret Louise Signorella
    Creator:
    • Signorella, Margaret L.
    • Frieze, Irene Hanson
    Description: To test developmental aspects of gender schema theories, girls in grades 2 to 12 were given measures of gender role attitudes, self perceptions on gender related traits, reported participation in gender related activities, preferred occupation, and adult family preferences. Both children’s and adolescents’ results showed a multifactor structure. Children’s results differed from adolescents’ in that children had more measures showing significant age trends, with a general pattern of decreasing stereotyping with age. Children also had stronger associations among diverse measures than did adolescents. Results were consistent with both multifactorial and cognitive-developmental approaches to the development of gender schemas, and provided limited support for adolescent gender intensification hypotheses.
    Keywords: gender, stereotypes, children, adolescents
    Date Uploaded: 2015-07-04
  4. Nelson, Signorella, & Botti (2014). Accent, Gender, and Perceived Competence. [Download]

    Title: Nelson, Signorella, & Botti (2014). Accent, Gender, and Perceived Competence.
    Depositor: Margaret Louise Signorella
    Creator:
    • Nelson, Larry R.
    • Signorella, Margaret L.
    • Botti, Karin G.
    Description: Those who use non-indigenous accented speech often experience prejudice and discrimination, and in the United States, those speaking with Spanish accents are likely to be impacted. In research on the influence of accents on perceptions of the speaker, however, the relation of gender of the speaker or of the perceiver has received less attention. Therefore, in the present study, the impact of accent (North American- versus Spanish-accented English), gender of speaker, and gender of rater on perceptions of competence were investigated in a sample of undergraduate students in the United States. Participants listened to a recording of a newspaper article excerpt read by either a male or female speaker who spoke in English with either a North American or Spanish accent. The results from ratings of communication competence and speaker knowledge supported the hypotheses that Spanish-accented speakers would be more likely to be judged negatively, that female speakers would be more likely to receive negative assessments, and that male participants would be more likely than female participants to show bias related to accent. The neglect of gender in the study of accent bias is discussed.
    Keywords: gender, accent
    Date Uploaded: 2015-07-04
  5. Signorella, Bigler, & Liben (1993). Developmental differences in children's gender schemata about others: A meta-analytic review. Developmental Review, vol. 13 [Download]

    Title: Signorella, Bigler, & Liben (1993). Developmental differences in children's gender schemata about others: A meta-analytic review. Developmental Review, vol. 13
    Depositor: Margaret Louise Signorella
    Creator:
    • Signorella, Margaret L,
    • Bigler, Rebecca S.
    • Liben, Lynn S.
    Description: Inconsistencies that have been reported in past research on developmental changes in gender schemata actually may be a consequence of differences in the way these schemata have been conceptualized and measured. Meta-analysis was used to evaluate this interpretation of past work. On forced choice measures, in which children must select one sex or the other for each item (e.g., "Who is the strong one?"), "correct" matches to societal stereotypes increased with age. Increases were not, however, related to the type of question used (e.g., "Who is ...?" versus "Who can ...?"). Girls made more stereotype matches than boys, although the magnitude of the effect was small. In contrast, on nonforced choice measures, type of question did affect results. Children showed increases in nonstereotyped responses with age, but especially when asked "Who should . . ." or "Who can . . ." , and when elementary-school-aged (as well as preschool-aged) children were included. Girls gave significantly more nonstereotyped responses than boys, especially among older samples and when the domain was traits. Both the age and the sex effects in nonstereotyped responses were larger in more recent studies. IQ and television viewing were significantly related to forced choice scores, whereas television viewing, maternal employment, and memory for gender-stereotyped material were all significantly related to non-forced choice scores. Implications for the distinction between knowledge of stereotypes and attitudes toward stereotypes are discussed.
    Keywords: gender, development, stereotypes, schemas, attitudes
    Date Uploaded: 2015-07-04
  6. "Wretched" or Respectable: Judging Women in Late-Victorian London Courts [Download]

    Title: "Wretched" or Respectable: Judging Women in Late-Victorian London Courts
    Depositor: Sira Sidibe
    Creator:
    • Sidibe, Sira
    Description: This research highlights the inequalities of courts in Late-Victorian London. Gender discrimination among women was discovered using newspaper reports. These reports displayed immediate social judgement of victims, offenders, and other parties completely irrelevant to the case at hand.Before being found guilty or not guilty, women were more commonly judged on their ability to properly fulfill their domestic roles and expectations.
    Keywords: Late-Victorian London, London Courts, London Newspapers, petty trials, gender, inequality
    Date Uploaded: 2015-06-01
  7. Signorella, Frieze, & Hershey (1996). Single-Sex Versus Mixed-Sex Classes and Gender Schemata in Children and Adolescents: A Longitudinal Comparison. Psychology of Women Quarterly, vol. 20. [Download]

    Title: Signorella, Frieze, & Hershey (1996). Single-Sex Versus Mixed-Sex Classes and Gender Schemata in Children and Adolescents: A Longitudinal Comparison. Psychology of Women Quarterly, vol. 20.
    Depositor: Margaret Louise Signorella
    Creator:
    • Signorella, Margaret L.
    • Frieze, Irene Hanson
    • Hershey, Susanne
    Description: Positive effects for women and girls of all-female schools have been proposed, although there is relatively little clear empirical support for these beneficial results. Much of the cited research is based on elite all-female institutions or on parochial schools. This study takes advantage of the change of a private, non parochial school from all girls to both sexes. Longitudinal data from grades 2 through 12 were collected over the course of the academic year to study the results of this transition. Stereotyping declined with age and over time in both types of classrooms. Girls in single-sex classrooms showed some tendency to be more stereotyped in their perceptions of mixed-sex classrooms than did the girls who were actually in that setting. Thus, none of the measures showed any significant increase over time in stereotyping among girls in mixed-sex classes. Implications of these findings are discussed.
    Keywords: gender, single-sex education, stereotypes
    Date Uploaded: 2015-05-10
  8. Signorella (2010, April). Historical overview of the single-sex education debate. Paper presented at the meeting of the Gender Development Research Conference, San Francisco, CA. [Download]

    Title: Signorella (2010, April). Historical overview of the single-sex education debate. Paper presented at the meeting of the Gender Development Research Conference, San Francisco, CA.
    Depositor: Margaret Louise Signorella
    Creator:
    • Margaret L. Signorella
    Description:
    Keywords: gender, single-sex education
    Date Uploaded: 2015-04-05
  9. Signorella, Hayes & Li (2013). A Meta-Analytic Critique of Mael et al.'s (2005) Review of Single-Sex Schooling. Sex Roles, vol. 69. [Download]

    Title: Signorella, Hayes & Li (2013). A Meta-Analytic Critique of Mael et al.'s (2005) Review of Single-Sex Schooling. Sex Roles, vol. 69.
    Depositor: Margaret Louise Signorella
    Creator:
    • Signorella, Margaret L.
    • Li, Yidi
    • Hayes, Amy Roberson
    Description: Continued controversy in the United States over the relation of school gender composition to student outcomes is partially due to the failure to reach consensus on how to evaluate the research and the conclusions to be drawn from the research. In this review we examine major problems in the available research on single-sex schools, in terms of both theory and methodology. We critically examine the major review done by Mael, Alonso, Gibson, Rogers, and Smith (2005) and identify serious problems in studies under review and the review methods. Drawing from both U.S. and non-U.S. samples, a subset of outcome measures (mathematical performance, verbal performance, self-esteem or self-concept) were analyzed using meta-analytic techniques. No significant effects for school gender composition were observed for either mathematical performance or self measures. There was a small advantage observed on verbal performance for students in single-sex schools, but in this comparison there was a strong relation between the direction of the effect on the outcome measure and pre-existing differences. For the three comparisons combined, preexisting student differences in SES or cognitive performance revealed advantages to students in single-sex schools. In conjunction with research showing that control of preexisting differences reduces or removes single-sex school advantages, this review provides support for the position that single-sex schools may offer no advantage to student cognitive performance or social development, but rather may reflect the consequences of a more select and advantaged student population.
    Keywords: single-sex schooling, meta-analysis, gender
    Date Uploaded: 2013-07-14
  10. Signorella; Gender and Development in Sex Roles [Editorial]_2012.67.373-374 [Download]

    Title: Signorella; Gender and Development in Sex Roles [Editorial]_2012.67.373-374
    Depositor: Margaret Louise Signorella
    Creator:
    • Margaret L. Signorella
    Description:
    Keywords: development, gender, research
    Date Uploaded: 2013-05-19